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Capacity for Transition

Revitalise Te Taiao

Place-based research to develop evidence-based examples of how agribusinesses and communities can make enduring changes in land use, management, value chains, and market focus to revitalise te Taiao

This model (Taiao Manawa Ora: Purpose-led Change) guides the Revitalise te Taiao research programme. Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the relationship and connection between tangata whenua and tangata Tiriti are at the center. The central patiki (diamond) illustrates the inter-relationship of values, knowledge, and worldviews of tangata whenua and tangata Tiriti. The outer ‘wings’ highlight the differences. While recognising this difference, these principles also share a high level of connectedness across cultures to gather and share information on the social, ecological, and cultural context of the three pilots as they move along their Te Taiao pathway.
This model (Taiao Manawa Ora: Purpose-led Change) guides the Revitalise te Taiao research programme. Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the relationship and connection between tangata whenua and tangata Tiriti are at the center. The central patiki (diamond) illustrates the inter-relationship of values, knowledge, and worldviews of tangata whenua and tangata Tiriti. The outer ‘wings’ highlight the differences. While recognising this difference, these principles also share a high level of connectedness across cultures to gather and share information on the social, ecological, and cultural context of the three pilots as they move along their Te Taiao pathway.

PROJECT DETAILS

Challenge funding: $8,000,000

Research duration: January 2022 – June 2024

What Are We Doing?

E ngā mana, e ngā reo, nau mai piki mai kake mai ra ki te waka Taiao e toia nei ngā ohāki kia toitū te whenua, kia toiora te wai. Ko ngā tikanga o te Tiriti o Waitangi e paihere i te kaupapa whakarauora Taiao, kia eke panuku, kia eke tangaroa, te kaupapa rangahau o Revitalise te Taiao. Whai oranga mauri ora.

Food producers all over the world are facing connected challenges: the health of soil and water, climate change, and changing customer expectations. We can respond to these challenges in a uniquely Aotearoa way by implementing Te Tiriti o Waitangi principles in all efforts to help revitalise te Taiao – the land, water, climate, and biodiversity that contains and surrounds us all.

The motivation for change starts with ‘sense of place’, where people feel they belong. For Māori, connections and whakapapa back to the whenua are interlinked with identity, health, and wellbeing. This research will work in three locations alongside agribusinesses and communities as they progress land-use change, work with value chains and connect with markets to revitalise te Taiao. Respecting that all knowledge starts as local knowledge, solutions will be tailored to fit the local context of production, economy, community, and environment.

Te Tiriti o Waitangi principles of partnership, participation and protection are central to this research.

How Can The Research Be Used?

  • Inspiring and practical examples of communities and agribusinesses moving along the pathway to revitalise te Taiao will be highlighted. The research will provide evidence to guide actions to enable other communities and agribusinesses to take a similar journey.
  • Agribusiness entrepreneurs and innovators will work side-by-side with scientists to progress te Taiao pathways, understand these journeys, and create change beyond the programme.
  • This programme aims to understand what land use, management, value chain and market opportunities can be identified if agribusinesses and communities begin with te Taiao. The work of the three pilots will be connected with value chains that are willing to put te Taiao at the centre, to explore whether this resonates with consumers and enables producers to gain a premium for their products.
  • The research team will develop principles for land-use change that enable agribusinesses, mana whenua, farmers, growers, and communities to take collective responsibility for revitalising te Taiao. External conditions that are needed to achieve widespread and significant change will also be identified.
  • The research will produce evidence of how specific markets respond to te Taiao narratives based on connection to people, place, and indigenous knowledge.
  • The research team will gather data from interviews, surveys, observation, and participation to understand the values, beliefs, and practices that underpin collective understanding, motivation, and action to revitalise te Taiao.

 

Research Updates

Waiwanaka Key Image1200x800

Aug 19 2022

WAI Wānaka is Turning Knowledge into Action to Revitalise Te Taiao

The National Science Challenge funding allocated to the Revitalise te Taiao programme has seen three place-based research ...
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Overlooking Te Rewarewa

Aug 19 2022

Te Kāhui Rau Aims to Revitalise Te Taiao Through Hapū Whenua and Whānau

The National Science Challenge funding allocated to the Revitalise te Taiao programme has seen three ...
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Agrisea Rua Photo 3 June 22 3x2landscapecrop

Aug 19 2022

Rere ki Uta, Rere ki Tai Aims to Revitalise Te Taiao with a Focus on the Mana and Mauri of Soil

Kotahi te koohao o te ngira e kuhuna ai, te miro maa, te miro whero ...
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Three Communities to Share $8M Research Fund to Revitalise te Taiao

Aug 18 2022

Three Communities to Share $8M Research Fund to Revitalise te Taiao

Three pilot projects in Paeroa, Taranaki and Wānaka have each received a share of $8 ...
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Revitalise te Taiao Team

Jul 28 2022

Te Tiriti o Waitangi Principles Help Revitalise te Taiao

Hereherea te tau o tokiTe whāroa o te taiaoKia kōwhiti te maramaTe punga o ngā ...
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Revitalise te Taiao Working Group Photo

Jul 18 2022

Working Group Achieve Milestone for Revitalise te Taiao

Tuituia ngā pae mātaurangakia Toitū te whenua, kia Toiora te wai. He mihi maioha ki ...
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Participation & Engagement

  • Participants in the pilot project include mana whenua, farmers and growers, agribusiness innovators and entrepreneurs, and researchers.
  • Te Tiriti o Waitangi principles of partnership, participation and protection are guiding the implementation of the Revitalise Te Taiao research internally and with the three pilots (Ngā Kaiurungi Taiao), which include tangata whenua and tangata Tiriti.
  • The research embraces diversity of knowledge and ways of knowing within different worldviews. Revitalise Te Taiao is mātauranga-led, science-informed, te Taiao-inspired research. We respectfully incorporate te reo Māori me ona tikanga values in how we communicate and engage.
  • This research was established under terms that prioritised inclusion in the three pilots of Māori agribusiness and land management. Revitalise Te Taiao was co-designed and co-developed by 25 individuals from across Māori agribusiness, mātauranga Māori practitioners, scientists, researchers, community leaders, government and industry representatives.
  • Participants from Māori business and community members have a diverse range of skills and experience, including kaupapa Māori, Māori-centered and Māori-led initiatives and research; and mātauranga Māori with respect to land and freshwater-based sustainable business.

Team Snapshot

INFOGRAPHIC

Taiao Manawa Ora: Purpose-led Change

Murray Hemi
Model for guiding partnerships between tangata whenua and tangata Tiriti

This model (Taiao Manawa Ora: Purpose-led Change) guides the Revitalise te Taiao research programme. Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the relationship and connection between tangata whenua and tangata Tiriti are at the center. The central patiki (diamond) illustrates the interrelationship of values, knowledge, and worldviews of tangata whenua and tangata Tiriti. The outer ‘wings’ highlight the differences. While recognising this difference, these principles also share a high level of connectedness across cultures to gather and share information on the social, ecological, and cultural context of the three pilots as they move along their te Taiao pathway.

PAPERS

Reflecting on the journey of environmental farm planning in New Zealand

Simon Stokes, Katrina A. Macintosh & Richard W. McDowell
New Zealand Journal of Agricultural Research, February 2021

Environmental farm planning in New Zealand dates to the 1950s when soil conversation plans were first undertaken. Since then the extent and complexity of whole farm sustainability along with regulatory drivers and environmental compliance targets has increased. The public, and consumers, both domestically and internationally, are placing ever increasing demands and expectations on farmers to deliver high-quality produce with strong environmental values. Regulatory reform is challenging, with the details around the implementation process varying and far from clear. National-scale freshwater farm plans will be mandatory and enforceable in New Zealand within a few years. How this will deliver a clearer pathway to integrated resource management and provide the primary sectors with a tool to be world leaders in environmental management will depend upon plans being farmer centric and owned and adding value to their business.

Reshaping a farming culture through participatory extension: An institutional logics perspective

Jorie Knook, James A. Turner
Journal of Rural Studies, August 2020

Participatory extension programmes influenced practices, beliefs and values underlying the learning logic (changing from a ‘linear’ to ‘multi-actor’ logic) and thus can help facilitate more effective practice change by providing support via micro-mechanisms and enabling dynamics. The study contributes to current literature by introducing a new lens for understanding change induced by participatory extension programmes and by providing change agents, such as extensionists, with more in-depth knowledge about the main logics guiding the culture of farming, and the mechanisms by which farmer practices, beliefs and values may change. The in depth-knowledge will help to communicate, frame and organise extension initiatives.

Navigating Institutional Challenges: Design to Enable Community Participation in Social Learning for Freshwater Planning

James A. Turner, Will Allen, Caroline Fraser, Andrew Fenemor, Akiko Horita, Toni White, Lan Chen, Maggie Atkinson & Michelle Rush
Environmental Management, February 2020

This research project was informed by this paper from the Wheel of Water project: https://wheelofwater.wordpress.com. Social learning is a process suited to developing understanding and concerted action to tackle complex resource dilemmas, such as freshwater management. In practice, social learning encounters challenges from shared habits and routines of stakeholders embedded in organisational structures and norms of professional behaviour. A freshwater planning exercise was designed, implemented and evaluated as a social learning process with community groups in two New Zealand catchments. Incorporating participatory reflection enabled the project team to modify social learning design to manage institutional influences hindering progress toward outcomes. Findings emphasise that social learning is underpinned by participants’ changing assumptions about what constitutes the institution of learning itself. Reflecting on these assumptions challenged participants’ expectations about their own and others’ behaviours and roles in freshwater planning.

REPORTS

Revitalising Te Taiao: How to co-design a place-based approach to support purposeful change and resilience

Simon Stokes, Richard Jones, James Turner, Murray Hemi, Carla Muller, Heather Collins, Clémence Vannier, Lucy Burkitt, Clare Bradley, Justine Young, Nick Roskruge, Piripi Perry-Smith, Dayle Hunia, Renee Kahukura Iosefa
Report for Our Land and Water, 2021

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