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E.coli

Charles Farmer, PIXNIO

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Summer swims in a lake or river are an important part of Kiwi culture – but to be safe, the presence of E.coli (Escherichia coli) bacteria has to be minimised. These resources aim to reduce farm sources of E.coli and improve its detection.

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Journal Article

Assessing the Yield and Load of Contaminants with Stream Order: Would Policy Requiring Livestock to Be Fenced Out of High-Order Streams Decrease Catchment Contaminant Loads?

This paper won the JEQ Best Paper Award 2019. Concentration and flow data for 1998 to 2009 were used to calculate catchment load and yields…
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Journal Article

Indirect faecal source tracking methods to elucidate critical sources and contaminant transfers through catchments – a review

In New Zealand, there is substantial potential for microbial contaminants from agricultural fecal sources to be transported into waterways. Understanding contaminant transport pathways from catchment…
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Journal Article

Variability of Escherichia coli Concentrations in Rivers during Base-Flow Conditions in NZ

We compared the variability of E. coli concentrations in baseflow of 3 different-sized rivers in both summer and winter at the time scales of minutes,…
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Presentation

Variability of E. coli in rivers during base-flow conditions

Water Microbiology Conference, May 2018 | NZ Freshwater Sciences Society Annual Conference, December 2018
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Journal Article

gndDb, a Database of Partial gnd Sequences To Assist with Analysis of Escherichia coli Communities Using High-Throughput Sequencing

The use of culture methods to detect Escherichia coli diversity does not provide sufficient resolution to identify strains present at low levels. Here, we target…
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Journal Article

The effectiveness of streambank fencing to improve microbial water quality: a review

This literature review collates published data on the effectiveness of fencing stock out of waterways to reduce faecal indicator bacteria concentrations in streams. Eighteen suitable…
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Method

A Heuristic Method for Determining Changes of Source Loads to Comply with Water Quality Limits in Catchments

A common land and water management task is to determine where and by how much source loadings need to change to meet water quality limits…
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Journal Article

Mitigation of phosphorus, sediment and Escherichia coli losses in runoff from a dairy farm roadway

Dairy cow deposits on farm roadways are a potential source of contaminants entering streams. Phosphorus (P), suspended sediment (SS) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) loads…
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Journal Article

The impact of cattle grazing and treading on soil properties and the transport of phosphorus, sediment and E. coli in surface runoff from grazed pasture

Contaminant loss from grazed pasture can negatively affect freshwater quality. There is, however, little data on the impact of different levels of grazing/treading on contaminant…
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Method

Refinement of the Framework for Assessment of Recreational Water Quality

Regional and city council staff now have a documented process to follow when faecal contamination is identified in freshwater, created by ESR researchers involved in…
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Technical Report

Faecal source tracking and the identification of naturalised Escherichia coli to assist with establishing water quality and faecal contamination levels

E. coli are routinely measured as faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) to provide indications of microbial water quality in parallel with other physico-chemical parameters. Recent evidence…
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Technical Report

Faecal source tracking to understand the role of introduced predators and avian species on water quality assessments in the Makiriri Reserve, Dannevirke

Escherichia coli are used as indicators of faecal contamination in water quality assessments, but ‘naturalised’ non-faecal E. coli and non-pathogenic E. coli-like bacteria can confound…
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