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We are producing tools and outputs to increase understanding and implementation of kaitiakitanga principles and collaborative practices, to improve decision-making in catchments and speed up adoption of research

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Outcome Spaces Framework

The Outcome Spaces Framework should be used at the very beginning of a research project to negotiate and plan for preferred outcomes at the end. The process clarifies the different reasons researchers and stakeholders have agreed to collaborate in the project and their expectations about the project’s outcomes. An early discussion helps to bring to the foreground these differences, make them transparent and jointly clarify which of them are preferred by the project team and within or beyond the boundaries of the project.

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Process for Urban Māori to Reconnect With Their Whenua

Urban Māori can use the Māori Maps platform, built upon by Mauri Whenua Ora researchers, to find their proximal ancestral marae.

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Model: Reducing GHG Emissions and Nitrogen Leaching on Dairy Farms

The Credence Attributes On-Farm research project modelled several scenarios to reduce greenhouse gas emissions on an average Waikato dairy farm. The model found one path to producing carbon-neutral dairy products that also decreases nitrogen leaching by 42 percent.

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Climate Change Impacts on Land Use Suitability &ndash Webinar

This webinar discusses the potential impacts of climate change on pastoral, arable and horticultural farm systems, and appropriate adaptation measures.

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Climate Change Impacts on Land Use Suitability &ndash Report

This report identifies the potential impacts of climate change on pastoral, arable and horticultural farm systems, and appropriate adaptation measures. This research used and compared several biophysical models to project future changes in production and impacts on nutrient loss and water demand under different climate scenarios over the next 80 years.

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12 Questions Scientists Should Ask Stakeholders to Increase Research Impact

Research that ‘works’ in one place may not work when applied more widely. These 12 questions were designed by Our Land and Water scientists to help biophysical scientists understand the social variables influencing adoption and uptake. The first set of four questions are asked in the co-design and co-development process to frame the problem. Stakeholders and scientists should answer them again regularly throughout the life of the project, along with the second set of questions.

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Think ‘Outside the Room’ When Collaborating with Community

Involving small groups of community members in local government decisions doesn’t mean the wider community will trust those decisions. Increasing trust may require engagement with greater numbers and diversity of residents. This research summary provides guidance to those seeking to engage community members and build trust.

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Model of Aotearoa's Agri-Food and Fibre System

Our Land and Water has developed a new ‘mental model' of Aotearoa's agri-food and fibre system to underpin our research design, influence and align key stakeholders to better support land stewards to live and work in ways that are more connected to te Taiao. 

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Revealing Groundwater’s Denitrification Capacity

A new way to measure denitrification in groundwater has been proved, and could make analysing groundwater’s denitrification capacity more accessible for regional councils and farmers. The new method for measuring excess nitrogen could be used to locate and characterise groundwater denitrification sites, so spatial variability of sites and rates can be mapped. Identifying the location and efficiency of groundwater denitrification sites can result in more effective nutrient
loss regulations, more strategic nitrogen loss mitigation measures and improved land management

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Assessing the Effectiveness of On-Farm Mitigation Actions

This research summary describes how effective on-farm mitigations have been so far, by comparing losses of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and sediment in 1995 and 2015. It also models what would be possible for future water quality in 2035 if every farm in New Zealand adopted every known mitigation. This information is crucial to helping farmers in degraded catchments decide whether to continue investing in mitigation actions or consider making changes to land use or land-use intensity.

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Quantifying Excess Nitrogen Loads in Fresh Water

At least 43% of New Zealand’s agricultural land (31% of New Zealand’s total land area) is in catchments that are under pressure – ‘pressure' meaning the ratio of the current load of total nitrogen to the maximum allowable load of nitrogen that can be emitted and still meet current regulatory criteria. The nitrogen load reductions required to meet water quality objectives in some regions are large relative to existing loads. The current load is twice the maximum allowable load in parts of the Waikato, Manawatu-Wanganui, Marlborough, Canterbury, Otago and Southland.

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Map of Total Nitrogen Excess and Reduction Potential

An interactive map shows the total nitrogen (TN) in excess of current national rules and the potential for mitigation strategies to reduce TN losses from land to water by 2035. The map allows users to zoom in to any of New Zealand’s catchments or regions, and swipe between two views. Swiping to the left reveals the total nitrogen load in excess of current regulatory objectives. Swiping to the right reveals the potential for on-farm actions to reduce nitrogen loss from land to water. This allows New Zealanders to see which rivers, lakes and estuaries are under the most pressure from agriculture, and whether all farmers adopting all on-farm mitigation actions will ease this pressure by 2035.

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Four Steps to Develop Connected Local Farm Plans

To make farm plans an effective tool for improving waterways, we propose a four-step approach based on collective action delivered by catchment groups. Planning together is more efficient for everyone. Linking farm plans to sub-catchment priorities, and to each other, enables landowners to exchange knowledge and identify solutions unique to their soils, land use practices and waterways.

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Designing Effective Farm Environment Plans

We have prepared a guidance document for people who need to design effective FEPs, FEP templates and processes. It proses a four-step approach and makes 7 key recommendations. The focus of this guidance is freshwater, in line with Our Land and Water’s objective.

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Designing Freshwater Monitoring Programmes to Detect Early Improvement

This guidance document includes a recommended 5-step process for monitoring the effectiveness of actions to improve freshwater. It summarises the work of the Monitoring Design and Monitoring Technologies working groups, which developed proof-of-concept resources to help regional councils, government and multi-agency catchment groups design monitoring programmes that will measure the effectiveness of actions to improve freshwater.

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How To Identify Sources of Faecal Contamination

A new framework to guide regional authorities through the process of identifying sources of E. coli when water quality guidelines are exceeded – including what to do when the source of faecal pollution can’t be identified, or when actions to mitigate pollution don’t work.

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Adapting to Increasing Drought

Commissioned by three National Science Challenges, the report Growing Kai Under Increasing Dry brings together insights from farmers, growers, industry bodies, researchers, and government about how to adapt to intensifying drought conditions.

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LandscapeDNA

The LandscapeDNA information hub gives you access to the Physiographic Environment Classification developed with funding from Our Land and Water. Interactive maps allow you to explore right down to property scale. Videos for each environment show what contaminants are most susceptible to loss, how they travel, and where they end up. These insights will allow farmers to consider what actions they can take to minimise water contamination risks from their property.

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Actions to Include in a Farm Environment Plan

This interactive infographic compiles actions to decrease the loss of contaminants from agricultural land. Actions can be filtered by farm system, and by any of five critical issues (nitrogen, phosphorus, E.coli, sediment and GHGs). Applying both a farm type and issue filter enables a pop-up for each action containing a short description and data on co-benefits, factors that may limit application, and potential standard measurements.

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Key Variables for Design, Evaluation or Troubleshooting a Collaboration

A practical model of what conditions, capabilities and resourcing are necessary for collaboration to be successful, to be used in designing, evaluating or improving collaborative processes. This model was co-developed with collaboration practitioners across New Zealand. 

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Framework for Building and Improving Collaboration

Questions for designing, evaluating and critically reviewing a collaborative process for decision-making and policy-making.

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Guidance for Selecting Fit-for-Purpose Indicators

For OLW research, there are six criteria that are the most important for ensuring indicators are useful. Fit-for-purpose indicators are: accepted by stakeholders, valid, clearly defined and standardised, based on available or easily accessible data, easily communicable, performance-based.

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Kohuratia Web Tool to Identify Priority Actions for Agribusiness

The Kohuratia website provides agribusiness and farms in Aotearoa New Zealand with a snapshot of their current constraints and opportunities. Enter data about your organisation's values, current performance, capabilities and capacity, and the tool generates a series of priority actions that will help optimise economic, social and environmental outcomes. Kohuratia was developed for Māori agribusiness but can be used for any farm and has been tested with Pakehā farmers.

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Multi-Criteria Decision Making Framework

A framework to support making major decisions about on-farm change is described in a short Research Findings Brief, for farmers, growers, farm consultants, rural professionals and policy makers. This framework can help land managers be more certain that land-use change decisions are likely to meet their needs and concerns.

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I2S (Integration and Implementation Science) Framework

Collaboration Lab researchers found a significant relationship suggesting that when more elements of the I2S Framework were used in research, end-users found the results more usable, and the research was more effective. View video presentation here.

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Pōwhiri as a Tool for Collaboration

Collaboration Lab researchers are developing a method drawing on pōwhiri as a tool for collaboration. This concept is in the early stages of development and testing.

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Kete Aronui of Iwi of Te Taitokerau

This web-based resource informs the Taitokerau iwi CEOs of personal income levels, sources of income, type of employment or business ownership, employment within industry types, occupation types, education/qualification achievement and levels of engagement in tikanga Māori specific unpaid work, within each of the nine Taitokerau iwi populations.

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Maorimaps.com Waitangi Catchment Pilot

The Waitangi catchment pilot map provides a new web-enabled access tool that connects cultural GIS data and soil and water science, with the Māori Maps marae community platform. This provides new ways for mana whenua to engage with their awa and whenua to achieve their aspirations. Māori Maps acts as a portal to WhenuaViz data provided by Mauri Whenua Ora research. Work to extend the tool to the Bay of Plenty is currently underway.

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Method to Optimise Catchment Management Actions for Water Quality

Land Use Suitability research has developed a method to identify the most appropriate management actions for aquatic ecosystems. This method provides a valuable decision support strategy to optimise catchment management actions toward a water quality objective.

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Aligned Communication and Decision-Support Tools

Our research supports the use of these tools, which are aligned to the Our Land and Water mission. These are a sample of the availalble tools; there are many more processes, frameworks and business models that consider socio-cultural-economic factors

  • All
  • Agribusiness
  • Catchment Groups
  • Citizens
  • Hapū
  • Industry Bodies
  • Iwi
  • Land Owners
  • Māori Land Owners
  • Regional Councils
  • Researchers
  • Rural Professionals
  • Scientists
  • Students
  • Whānau

Environmental Report Cards

Environmental Report Cards convey monitoring results and support management and restoration of freshwater bodies. Environmental Report Cards are an engagement tool designed to galvanise commitment and action by getting communities to walk their lands, observe their waters and debate the state of their environment. For a Māori community it is important to develop and apply Environmental Report Cards to address specific needs and practices of that rohe and communicate the cultural health of the catchment.

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Cultural Impact Assessment

Part of the Māori resource management landscape under the RMA, Cultural Impact Assessments (CIA) are a primary tool to assist in determining the effect of any proposal on the environment, culture or values as they might be understood by Māori interests. A CIA illuminates the cultural values underpinning a resource and its potential or actual use.

Note that views on appropriate tools will vary between rohe and mana whenua, and tools are not a substitute for collaboration and relationship building with local whānau and hapū.

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Te Mauri Model Decision Making Framework

The ‘mauriometer’ model aims to assist in understanding the interconnectedness of all living things. It assesses the impact of practices or activities on the mauri of a resource and attributes scores and weightings to mauri of the whānau (family, economic), mauri of the community (social), mauri of the hapū (cultural) and mauri of the ecosystems (environment).

Note that views on appropriate tools will vary between rohe and mana whenua, and tools are not a substitute for collaboration and relationship building with local whānau and hapū.

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CSIRO Adopt

ADOPT – the Adoption & Diffusion Outcome Prediction Tool – is an online tool that predicts farmer uptake of new agricultural practices and innovations. It estimates time to near-peak adoption level (99%) within target farmer populations.

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Beyond Results

Collaboration Lab researchers have evaluated the contribution of a co-innovation approach to the impact of science, and found the greater the extent to which 5 co-innovation principles were implemented, the greater the perceived potential impact of the science. The Beyond Results and Beyond Results Primary Innovation websites include guides, tools and templates to support researchers, scientists and project leaders in implementing co-innovation.

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LAWA

LAWA is an online map that collates and presents information from regional councils on fresh water and beach water quality, air quality and land cover. It helps local communities and individuals understand and connect with environmental information. The ‘Can I Swim Here’ tool is popular.

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